Tag Archives: mythology

MINI MYTHS BOARD BOOKS FOR YOU(r Kids)

If you’re going to read the same book to your toddler fifty times in a row, make sure you don’t want to gouge your own eyes out in the process.

I’ve found quite a few books that my husband and I adore reading to our sons, many in thanks to my comic convention attending friends. The Mini Myths Board Books came to us, as so many wonderful enrichment does lately, through our local library.

Read more on Dwarf+Giant

Graphic by @heatherwhooo

 

Cover Reveal: Dream Eater

dream-eater-front

This is how K. Bird Lincoln’s latest urban fantasy was described to me: “a half-Japanese college student discovers her mythological parentage.”

Sold.

I learned more details on Lincoln’s author page*: “half-Japanese girl finds out she’s the daughter of mythological, dream-eating Baku, yearns for delicious artisan chocolate, meets a handsome stranger with a secret of his own, and fends off attacks by creepy community college professors and water dragons.”

Although I’m a fairy/folk tale/mythology nut, I don’t know much about Japanese mythology (thanks, Eurocentric education). When I looked up Baku, I learned that is the spirit who can eat people’s nightmares.

“A child having a nightmare in Japan will wake up and repeat three times, “Baku-san, come eat my dream.” Legends say that the baku will come into the child’s room and devour the bad dream, allowing the child to go back to sleep peacefully.”

My son is starting to have nightmares. Maybe calling on Baku-san will help him fight through them. We have to stay careful though, because if you call on Baku too much, s/he may gobble up your good dreams as well. What does that leave you with?

I’ve enjoyed quite a few stories published by World Weaver Press lately, including The Falling of the Moon, Covalent Bonds (a geek romance anthology that is making me rethink the romance genre), and He Sees You When You’re Sleeping (an anthology of Krampus stories). Once I finish Dream Eater, I’ll let you know how it fares for lovers of mythology/urban fantasy.

K. Bird Lincoln’s Japanese-inspired urban fantasy novel DREAM EATER will be available from World Weaver Press in early 2017. Here’s how to add it to your Goodreads to-read shelf.

*I love that Lincoln calls this “my online presence.”

^I got this from Wikipedia, who lists their sources as:

  1. M.Reese:”The Asian traditions and myths”.pg.60
  2. Jump up^ Hadland Davis F., “Myths and Legends of Japan” (London: G. G. Harrap, 1913)

#ChanceItLA – our Picks for Hollywood Fringe Festival 2015

#SeeItorSkipItLA
Coverage of 2015 Hollywood Fringe Festival
Hosted by Cindy Marie Jenkins ( @cindymariej ) as part of @SeeItorSkipItLA

More info at http://www.seeitorskiptitla.com &
https://cindymariejenkins.com/see-it-or-skip-it-la/

Correspondent Guests:
Sara Fenton (@Fentonova)
Lemuel H. Thornton III (@Lemwerks)
Madeline Rosenstein (@mfrosens)

Shows to #ChanceItLA (click on title for websites):

ALL AGREE:

Four Clowns Presents The Halfwits’ Last Hurrah

LEM

*Jason and Medea

*Getting to Know You

*Hamlet Mobile

 

SARA

*Tiananmen Annie

*The Three Musketeerers: Clowns with Swords

*Skanky Me from Kankakee

MADELINE

*The Blacks a Clown Show (Cindy note: in their Fringe profile page, they claim to be “remounting America’s longest running off-Broadway play”. I think they mean “revive,” not “remount,” as the original off-Broadway production opened in 1961 and this company didn’t produce it. This may have no bearing on their ability to produce a fine piece of art, but a mistake like that does make me hesitate and I personally won’t be prioritizing it. I saw this on their page after we recorded the podcast.)

*5 Sirens Beware of Rocks

*The Devil You Say

*HollywoodFringe.org/free

 

Cindy

*The Voyage of Odysseus

*The Snail

*Romeo & Juliet: An ASL Love Story

 

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Why Water Falls

50 Shades of Shrew

Marry me a Little (Cindy note – Probably only interesting for Sondheim lovers)

It’s the Prom 

Two Girls, One Bard 

8:03 

Wombat Man

Danny and the Deep Blue Sea

Timeheart by Robot Teammate & Accidental Party

Alien vs Musical

Catherine: Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey in Today’s LA 


Other Correspondents:
Kat Michels (@fictionoftruth)
Courtney Ann Buchan (@CourtneyABuchan)

Sponsored by Theatre Asylum (@TheatreAsylum)

Funding Fridays – new play Tauris in NYC

Hear from Sarah Moon about

fundraising for a new play Tauris.

Tauris image with black (1)From Sarah: New play Tauris will be performed as a staged reading at the Wild Project in New York March 16th and 17th.  https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/921097.
I’m fundraising with Kickstarter to help cover the costs of production, rehearsal and publicity. This reading is an important step in the development of the play and I feel grateful to have the opportunity to workshop it with a great cast, director and music director before another revision and full production — Tauris has been accepted into the Planet Connections festival in June.
This play adapts the Greek drama Iphegenia at Tauris, mashing it up with sci-fi elements, contemporary issues and music to create a story that is adventurous, dramatic and sometimes funny. The play aims to address the challenges we face as a society and as individuals regarding a shift away from a one-way relationship with nature to real sustainability. The goal is not to preach or “teach the world to sing.” We’re well past the shaming phase of environmentalism, we’re well past believing in a utopian back-to-land fantasy. Where does that put us? This play explores where we’re at now relative to re-shaping our relationship to the earth and each other and the personal issues we face in coming to terms with the fact that no one of us can make the journey alone. Tauris at Indy
We’re raising $2,500 to cover the costs of production. Whether you can contribute $3 or $30 or more, it means a lot. And if you don’t have a cent to spare, but know some people who would be interested in supporting this project, please pass this along.

Spooky Shakespeare Brings me Joy

Follow him @ShimermanArmin too!

The Antaeus Company hosts Salons every Monday to really dig into some aspect of the classics and theatre in general. They all sound really interesting, but the evening I signed up to attend immediately was Ghosts, Demonology & Fairies in Shakespeare, moderated by Armin Shimerman!

I’m a huge text analysis nerd, but even more so because Armin always puts the play in context of the society and culture (audience) for whom it was originally written. This means long-standing psychological and dramaturgical fights vanish (pun intended) when confronted with simple realities like who was in Shakespeare’s audience.

A few days beforehand, attendees were told to be familiar with Hamlet  and Macbeth. Two of my favorites, so no problem. Then instructions came to familiarize ourselves with King James’ Daemonology Treatise. Fascinating stuff.

However, I don’t recommend anyone make the mistake I did, and in order to understand slightly archaic language, read it out loud while on a public bus. I wondered why people moved away from me.

So a lovely casual conversation ensued. Armin clarified at the top that we were looking at the Ghost in Hamlet and Witches/Lady Macbeth if we had time. Although not necessarily Halloween-themed, he said : “Religion for me is always spooky.”

I personally always like to remind myself before these things start about why I wanted to attend, and spend money on an evening like this. Besides the fact that Armin holds so much knowledge that I’d pay to listen to him discuss the finer attributes of taxes, I also realized that I don’t get excited about Shakespeare as much as in the past. One recent exception was two weeks ago when I watched 3 separate performances of 24th ST’s special engagement Nearly Lear, and found joy and discovery within every single viewing.*

I’ve also heard about Macbeth from Armin a few years ago when he was guest at a workshop rehearsal I directed, so I was glad we started with Hamlet.

Okay. There is no way I can properly relate to you everything we said, learned or discovered, except for this main theme that keeps running through my head:

Hamlet is a mystery. 

For those of us who grew up knowing Hamlet‘s plot before ever seeing it onstage, that is hard to fathom, never mind remember. How often is a story ruined by creators forgetting that their audience doesn’t know the plot? Sad, really.

Here are some other tidbits, in no particular order:

  • The Senecan Ghost: If I weren’t a Halloween curmudgeon, I might have found a way to go as one. In almost every Senecan Drama, a ghost appears in something like a white sheet (sound familiar?) and tells everyone how horrible things are and how badly we need revenge.
  • There are distinct differences between how a Catholic and how a Protestant would consider/approach Hamlet’s Father’s Ghost. It actually forms the crux of the whole play, since whether the Ghost was telling the truth dictated what would happen to Hamlet if he believed him and murdered his Uncle in revenge.
  • Armin: “The actor must pick one meaning [for a line] and the audience can have two. That’s poetry.” This was a throw-away line, mind you. He’s just that amazing.
  • Somehow, amidst all of his religious currents, Shakespeare never got arrested. His plays linger and live in the contradiction between Catholics & Protestants at the time, but he was never thrown in jail.
  • Protestants literally believe there is an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other (“My shoulder angel!” for all you Emperor’s New Groove fans).
  • There is actually more to heaven and earth than can be dreampt of, or scholarized, and it is just so easy to take Shakespeare down the wrong path by remembering what you were taught vs the facts and words directly in front of you.
  • Taking Joy in Shakespeare really helps fuel a creative mind.

Antaeus only has 3 more Monday Salons left. Take any opportunity to hear Armin Shimerman talk Shakespeare.

*FULL DISCLOSURE: I am Outreach and Marketing Director for 24th ST. but am not required to include them in my blog, nor see the shows more than once. This one was really just that good.

Go Beyond the Blurb on Mondays

Arts Outreach is a huge part of The CMJ Stories. Every Monday I go Beyond the Blurb of an indie artist’s work, non profit or cause to cultivate more of their audience. Wednesday is Wild Card Day, and usually includes live streams with great speakers!

Here is a clip of the theme song, composed by Adam Emperor Southard.

The playlist of interviews conducted so far:

YouTube channel

Facebook.com/theCMJstories

Dr. Jen Gunter

Wielding the lasso of truth

(not) Mixed (up)

A Biracial Swirl in a Black and White World

5amWritersClub

Sponsored by Caffeine.

Way-Word Writer

Heather Cashman

Orlando Convention Printing

Your One-Stop Orlando Printing Solution

TheWhizpops.com

Information about "The Whizpops!"

Whatever, I Eat What I Want

Surviving Cultural and Culinary Post-Modernity

Laura Grace Weldon

Free Range Learning, Creative Living, Gentle Encouragement, Big Questions, Poetry, Occasional Drollery

Cindy Marie Jenkins

Storyteller / Outreach Nerd

%d bloggers like this: